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Home / WLF TheySaid / 26 million trees have died in the Sierra since October, raising fire risk

  • 06/23/2016
  • Lars
  • 961 views
  • 1 Comment

Here is another interesting read about the tree kill in relations to fire risk. Obviously this is not new to the community but none-the-less interesting.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-drought-dead-trees-20160622-snap-story.html

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1 Comment
  1. techs672
    June 30, 2016 Reply

    “[...A]n analysis of wildfire extent in Oregon and Washington over the past 30 years shows very little difference in the likelihood of fires in forests with and without insect damage.”
    http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archives/2015/jul/insect-killed-forests-pose-no-additional-likelihood-wildfire

    “[…M]ountain pine beetle damage generally results in a dampening rather than an amplification of fire behavior and intensity.”
    http://articles.latimes.com/2010/sep/26/nation/la-na-beetle-fire-20100926

    “[…W]e find that insects generally reduce the severity of subsequent wildfires.”
    Do insect outbreaks reduce the severity of subsequent forest fires?
    21 April 2016 Environmental Research Letters, Volume 11, Number 4
    http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/11/4/045008/meta;jsessionid=1EEDA9C39CA9F9AC295E63650376411E.c3.iopscience.cld.iop.org

    “[…L]arge fires do not appear to occur more often or with greater severity in forest tracts with beetle damage. In fact, in some cases, beetle-killed forest swaths may actually be less likely to burn.”
    http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/beetles-fire.html

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